In the two months now since I got back from my literally life-changing trip to China, it’s taken about that long to organize my thoughts into a post on the subject.

… Just kidding.

A single post on the trip could easily be 40,000 words long. Ain’t nobody got time for that! So instead, I decided to divide it up into more readable chunks. At first I thought it would be by week, but then I thought it would be more convenient to divide it by city. In this first instalment, I’ll just talk about the process by which I made the plan and acquired the visa.

The planning began months before departure. I spent lots of time researching Lonely Planet’s substantial volume on China, collecting articles and inspiration on Facebook and Instagram, and trying to weed out things that were doable within a reasonable amount of time from the impossible. I quickly found that I couldn’t see all the things I wanted to see in a single week. Why not a month? Why not a grand tour of China over the course of a month? Even though I had a month, I still couldn’t do it all. I never got to see the 2008 Summer Olympics venues in Beijing, despite being there for four days; although there were tons of awesome things to see and do in the southern city of Guangzhou, I couldn’t justify the long detour; the same go for a “little jaunt” over to Tibet or Mongolia, where visa processes add time and complexity to the already-fraught application process.

The schedule I originally settled on was this: beginning with 4 days in Beijing, tracing my way down the coast with 2 days in Jinan, 2 days in Qingdao, a 1-day upshot to coastal beach town of Yantai, one night in Nanjing to reprise my attempt to stay there on the way back from Taiwan, 3 days in Shanghai, starting the journey west with 1 day in Hangzhou, 1 day in Zhangjiajie, 2 days each in Chongqing and Chengdu, 3 days in Lanzhou, 2 days each in Xi’an and Datong, and finally landing back in Beijing for a final night before taking off for the United States the next day.

Once deciding on the time-frame and buying the tickets, you can’t just apply for a visa as easily as in Vietnam. You must have a very detailed plan before you even set out to get the visa (once you schedule the appointment, you can get your visa in as soon as the same day or next day, depending on how much you’re willing to pay), so the hardest part is doing all that planning before you ever have the visa. You must have proof of all your hotel reservations (I found hostels on Hostelworld and Agoda), where you’re going each day, what you plan to do, and how you plan to travel between cities. When I got to the visa office, I had a plan but certainly not all the information. I had addresses for all the hotels but I needed phone numbers, too. I needed to re-print all of the proofs of reservation so that they specifically showed my name and not just confirmation number. It felt very scary, like they would be checking up on you at every hostel and you’d get in trouble if you changed your plans.

Once you fill out the forms and submit all the paperwork and payment, it’s actually quite fast to receive your visa. Just return to the office in 1-3 business days. It’s really expensive for US citizens to get a Chinese visa, more than USD $200, but luckily the visa is multiple-entry and lasts for 10 years. Unlike in Vietnam and other places, too, they truly do check your passport and visa every time you go into a subway, train station, or museum. (They, of course, confiscated my ARC at Gimpo Airport when I left the country, so my last remaining official ID was my passport.)

Before leaving, it was a constant jumble of offloading my stuff onto anyone who would take it, moving out, and sending my stuff home. (One of my boxes still has yet to arrive, after 3 full months at sea). I couldn’t send my laptop home, so I had to take it in the pack with me. I thought I could keep the contents of my pack in the big bag and have the small pack rolled up outside, but after just one or two cities I lost all sense of shame and started carrying one pack on my back and one on front, “like a proper backpacker.”

As with all trips, the plans never pan out. The real roster of places I visited was more pared-down, as I quickly discovered that it’s no fun to spend less than 24 hours in a city and then move on, so minimizing the amounts of one-day stays:

Beijing,

Jinan,

Qingdao,

Nanjing,

Shanghai,

Zhangjiajie,

Chongqing,

Chengdu,

Lanzhou,

Xi’an,

and Beijing again.

The accounts of each city will be linked above as they are written. There’s still a lot of work to do. However, this will have been my last big trip abroad for a long time, truly a once-in-a-lifetime journey, so I want to do it justice.

“How was your trip to China?” they ask me.

“Well, I vastly underestimated the amount of planning I needed to do, and vastly overestimated how much English people would know.”

“Oh.”

“In other words, it was an awesome trip for me but I would never wish it on anyone else.”

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4 thoughts on ““It’s not that late!”: All-China Tour 2018

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